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fer1972:

The Outdoor Art of Borondo

lurvemag:

kerry james marshall: look see 

 

David Zwirner Gallery

 

With a career spanning almost three decades, Marshall is well known for his paintings depicting actual and imagined events from African-American history. His complex and multilayered portrayals of youths, interiors, nudes, housing estate gardens, land- and seascapes synthesize different traditions and genres, while seeking to counter stereotypical representations of black people in society. Engaging with issues of identity and individualism, he frequently depicts his figures in an extreme opaque, black colour, which stylizes their appearance while being a literal and rhetorical reference to the term black and its diametric opposition to the white “mainstream.” With art history today acknowledged as having been written from the perspective of white Western artists, Marshall assimilates the limitations and contradictions inherent in its styles, subjects, and chronologies, creating highly personalised works that appear recognisable and unfamiliar at the same time.

Marshall also produces drawings in the style of comic strips, as well as sculptural installations, photography, and video. Like his paintings, these works accumulate various stylistic influences to address the historiography of black art, while at the same time drawing attention to the fact that they are not inherently partisan because their subjects are black.

For his first show with David Zwirner, Marshall will present new paintings that collectively examine notions of observing, witnessing, and exhibiting. While central to the relationship between viewer and artwork, these overarching concepts are typically steeped in conventions that render them passive acts. Yet, Marshall’s works subtly defy genre expectations and invite idiosyncratic, often ambiguous interpretations. Entitled Look See, the exhibition takes its point of departure in the etymological difference between looking and seeing, which embodies varying degrees of attentiveness. While “looking” is generally understood to be a removed, detached action, “seeing” involves perception and making connections between elements.

Works on view depict a series of characters amid ornate backdrops and dressed in outfits designed specifically for the paintings over a period of several years. Many emphasize the idea of display, such as Untitled (Crowning Moment), Marshall’s portrait of a young woman wearing an elaborate headband—based on a news photograph of a contestant putting on the winning crown at a beauty pageant—and Untitled (Beach Towel) in which the reclining female in a garden setting looks past the viewer to a camera not visible in the composition. In Untitled (Club Couple), a smiling couple poses blatantly as the male figure implicates the viewer in his plans by showing a small box with an engagement ring behind his girlfriend’s back. The exhibitionism inherent in such paintings—putting oneself on view—echoes the notion of pure presentation that runs throughout the artist’s new works. Marshall’s characters offer themselves to be looked at or are actively engaged with looking at something, including themselves.

Untitled (Mirror Girl), correspondingly, can only be seen in a mirror, where she appears to pose for her own enjoyment. In Untitled (Pink Towel), no indication is given to the identity of the woman, nude except for a towel that she holds up to casually cover her body. Looking straight at the viewer, her tilted head and pearl earring can be seen to imbue the everyday scene with an art-historical reference to Dutch painter Johannes Vermeer’s well-known portrait Girl with a Pearl Earring (c. 1665).

In the large-scale Untitled (Studio), Marshall depicts the process of a model having her portrait painted. The messy paints smattered across the table, floor, and even the resting dog further offer a metaphor for the staged nature of each of the works. The sense of fabrication is underscored by the unconventional clothing worn by most of the characters, created for the series as for a play or a movie. Yet while their peculiar combination of realism and fiction can be seen to connect the works conceptually—and also defines an immediacy rarely found in contemporary painting—each retains a singularity that seems to suggest that nothing has come before it. In Untitled (Blot), a single abstract canvas, also on a large scale, underscores the delicate link between representation and the real world more generally. As with Marshall’s wider oeuvre, fabrication here becomes linked to the realisation that the history of art as we know it is itself a construction of particular cultural and political perspectives, and always open to reinvention.

 

For more info please visit: http://www.davidzwirner.com/exhibition/kerry-james-marshall-2/

lurvemag:

matthew barney: Crown Zinc

Sadies Cole 

 In his third exhibition at Sadie Coles HQ, Matthew Barney presents a series of new sculptures. They have their origins in his 2014 film River of Fundament, a six-hour tour de force which premiered at the English National Opera this summer to wide acclaim. Each work condenses the film’s dominant themes – death, rebirth, and the twilight era of modern America – into totemic sculptural form, while invoking the complex personal iconography that Barney has developed over his twenty-year career.

Featuring an operatic score by Jonathan Bepler, River of Fundament transports the myth-laden narrative of Norman Mailer’s novel Ancient Evenings (1983) – itself based on the Egyptian Book of the Dead – into a contemporary American setting. The transmigration of the human soul (principally Mailer’s own) is symbolised by three iconic American cars: a 1967 Chrysler Imperial, a 1979 Pontiac Firebird, and a 2001 Ford Crown Victoria Police Interceptor. Each vehicle formed the centrepiece of an epic outdoor performance – staged between 2008 and 2013 in Los Angeles, Detroit and New York respectively – in which it underwent deconstruction and transformation echoing the distribution of Osiris’s body parts in Egyptian mythology.

Barney’s sculptures translate motifs from River of Fundament into autonomous works of art, bearing witness to these set-piece performances while recasting their themes of decay, regeneration and alchemical metamorphosis. Crown Victoria is a zinc cast of the third vehicle’s undercarriage, the prototype for which was created in an elaborate hieratic ceremony, BA (performed in New York in 2013). Sprawling and skeletal, it emanates the melancholic grandeur of an abandoned ruin or sarcophagus. Loops of corrugated tubing, arrayed like ribs along the chassis, evoke mummified remains; a large coiling pump speaks simultaneously of biological systems and insensate machinery. Marooned on blocks, the object stands both as a decimated vehicle and a body undergoing reincarnation: deposits of salt crystals at the two ‘poles’ of the sculpture seemingly presage a new transmutation.

In Crown Zinc a smaller fragment of the same vehicle has been cast in zinc and plated with gold. It is modelled on the grill from the Crown Victoria – an object that travels and transfigures over the course of River of Fundament. After being removed from the police car, it becomes the crown for which the Egyptian deities Set and Horus ritualistically compete. At several points in River of Fundament, a vehicle part is melted to produce a molten cast of an Egyptian Djed column (the symbol for Osiris’s spine, related to the Egyptian hieroglyph representing eternity and stability). This symbol finds a subtle manifestation in the mottled gold ‘pillar’ that clings like a shrunken fist or arcane seal to the immaculate plated surface of Crown Zinc.

Was takes the form of a vitrine containing a silver crow bar laid against a tubular mass of sulphur. The crow bar figured prominently in the stand-off between Set and Horus. This assemblage encapsulates the antithesis between creation and destruction that pervades River of Fundament: the crow bar appears simultaneously to carve out and chip away at the ‘raw substrate’ of the luminous green sulphur, sculpting it in the same moment as assailing it. Such a dualism inevitably recalls other cycles of production and destruction – from the geological to the corporeal. Referring to Mailer’s novel, Barney has commented that “you have elemental waste coming from the earth like sulfur, molten iron … [These] elements are interchangeable with the waste products of the body.” The show will include two new sculptures, Head of Norman III and Head of Young Hathfertiti, created using the ‘water casting’ process whereby molten metal is poured directly into water. The heads’ unique contours form naturally as the zinc cools and hardens in the water. Combining ancient methods of casting and gilding with emblematic materials – zinc, gold, crystals, silver, sulphur – Barney’s latest works reach into the murky recesses of ancient history and the human psyche. Within their spectacles of metamorphosis, his enduring artistic concerns – whether with alchemy or occultism, vitality or waste, eros or thanatos – well into view.

  For more information please visit: http://www.sadiecoles.com/press/176

tasteforthetasteless:

Natasha Lea-

tasteforthetasteless:

Natasha Lea-

(via artisafeeling)

eatsleepdraw:

desert
karlotta freier
http://karlottafreier.tumblr.com
cplu:

time to get spooky!

cplu:

time to get spooky!

(via scottwasham)



(Source: urbnite, via airows)

bewbin:

nasa trying to eat the moon

bewbin:

nasa trying to eat the moon

(Source: unknownskywalker, via airows)


(Source: theblacknurse, via artisafeeling)

jukeboxboombox:

Rooftops #2. December 2013. Bath.
By Mike Sutton | Facebook | For Sale

jukeboxboombox:

Rooftops #2. December 2013. Bath.

By Mike Sutton | Facebook For Sale

joelzimmer:

The Sky’s A-Flame

Gowanus, Brooklyn

(Source: Flickr / joelzimmer)